Seabird information

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White-capped albatross

Thalassarche (cauta) steadii

Has a pale blue beak and characteristic white underwings

Often seen around the Auckland Islands and the seas off southern New Zealand

Feeds on squid and fish, including waste discharged from fishing vessels

Breeds almost exclusively on the Auckland Islands from November to August

Travels to Australian waters and to South Africa (juveniles and non-breeding adults)

NZ Threat Classification Declining

Most of the 100,000 pairs of white-capped albatross nest on Disappointment Island in the Auckland Island group. In 1907 the Dundonald was shipwrecked there. According to one survivor's account, they ate up to five white-capped albatross per day and used bird bones for needles and their skins for mats.

Juvenile albatross spend six or more years at sea, flying with the strong winds and sitting on the water looking for food. When they first return to land to breed, their legs struggle to hold their body weight while walking and standing.

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White-capped albatross

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Thalassarche (cauta) steadii

Has a pale blue beak and characteristic white underwings

Often seen around the Auckland Islands and the seas off southern New Zealand

Feeds on squid and fish, including waste discharged from fishing vessels

Breeds almost exclusively on the Auckland Islands from November to August

Travels to Australian waters and to South Africa (juveniles and non-breeding adults)

NZ Threat Classification Declining

Most of the 100,000 pairs of white-capped albatross nest on Disappointment Island in the Auckland Island group. In 1907 the Dundonald was shipwrecked there. According to one survivor's account, they ate up to five white-capped albatross per day and used bird bones for needles and their skins for mats.

Juvenile albatross spend six or more years at sea, flying with the strong winds and sitting on the water looking for food. When they first return to land to breed, their legs struggle to hold their body weight while walking and standing.