Seabird information

<
>

Gibson’s wandering albatross

Toroa | Diomedea antipodensis gibsonii

Has a white body and head, and long black and white wings

Often seen around the New Zealand coast in winter and in the Southern Ocean

Feeds on squid and sometimes fish

Breeds on Auckland Islands, taking a full year to raise their chicks

Travels around the southern part of the globe

NZ Threat Classification Nationally Vulnerable

Along with the royal albatross, Gibson's albatross are the largest birds on Earth, standing 115 cm tall with a huge 3 m wingspan. They breed in alternate years as it takes 11 months to raise a chick.

When these birds get to 10-15 years of age their wing plumage starts to whiten (from the body outwards), much like human hair becoming grey with age.

The closely related Antipodes albatross, which is browner in colour, breeds only at the Antipodes Islands, though pairs occasionally nest at Campbell and Chatham Islands.

<

Gibson’s wandering albatross

> X
Toroa | Diomedea antipodensis gibsonii

Has a white body and head, and long black and white wings

Often seen around the New Zealand coast in winter and in the Southern Ocean

Feeds on squid and sometimes fish

Breeds on Auckland Islands, taking a full year to raise their chicks

Travels around the southern part of the globe

NZ Threat Classification Nationally Vulnerable

Along with the royal albatross, Gibson's albatross are the largest birds on Earth, standing 115 cm tall with a huge 3 m wingspan. They breed in alternate years as it takes 11 months to raise a chick.

When these birds get to 10-15 years of age their wing plumage starts to whiten (from the body outwards), much like human hair becoming grey with age.

The closely related Antipodes albatross, which is browner in colour, breeds only at the Antipodes Islands, though pairs occasionally nest at Campbell and Chatham Islands.